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HTTP Status Codes

When a browser requests a webpage, the server returns the response with an HTTP status code. Regardless of whether the server fulfills your request, the server will always return a status code to indicate the response was successful. If the server fails to return a response, the status code will indicate why it failed. The HTTP Status Code is returned as a part of the HTTP response header from the webserver.

A user agent is a string sent to the webserver when a page is requested by a browser. User Agent is a request header that is included with other HTTP headers and sent by the browser to identify itself which operating system and type of browser it is. The user agent is sent with every HTTP request it makes to a web server. Each browser provides a built-in user agent string when making a request, but this string can be changed by a user.

One of the best features of chromium browsers including Chrome, Opera, Vivaldi, and Brave is the ability to install browser extensions and add capabilities not built into the browser. There are thousands of browser extensions, and we have hand-picked a handful of "free" extensions that are useful to digital marketers. We've displayed the extensions in no particular order, so explore the extensions and see if it's worth to you.

Web browsers today offer a built-in password manager, and auto-populate username and password on the websites you visit. This is a very convenient feature offered by virtually all web browser makers including Google Chrome, Safari, Firefox, and Microsoft Edge. The question is whether you can trust browser password managers to store your passwords without a security risk.

Google Analytics keeps track of website visitors as users, and it uses the Client ID stored in the browser cookie to determine it. Google Analytics stores _ga cookie in the user's browser and the browser sends cookie data to a web server every time it makes a request. To view your Google Analytics (GA) cookie for a specific site, you may use developer tools available on your browser to view them. For example, on Google Chrome you may click the F12 key -> Applications Tab -> Cookies to view them. An example of "_ga" cookie looks like below:

WordPress is the most popular website builder platform that hosts up to 75 million websites on the Internet today. Despite its core being secure, hackers and other mischievous characters have compromised security for millions of self-hosted sites. The following 8 reasons describe why you need to secure your Wordpress website, and how to achieve them.

Bounce rate is a metric used to measure the percentage of visitors leaving your website after only 1-page view and nothing on the website. If a visitor lands on a web page and bounces back with no additional engagement after viewing the landing page, you have a bounce rate of 100% for that visit. By improving the quality of your website, you can lower your bounce rate and increase pages per session.

A reverse proxy is a server that sits in front of the webserver, intercepts the request, and either respond to the client with a response from its cache or forward the request to the origin server. A reverse proxy is used to protect the web servers from DDoS attacks, distribute load amongst multiple servers, and utilize its cache to serve static contents without sending requests to the origin server. No client will communicate directly with the server, and the server's IP address will not be revealed to the public.

You cannot afford slow loading pages if you are operating on the online platform. Internet users want quick access to information. You have seconds to capture and keep their interest. If they have to wait for your site to load, you will lose them.

It is important to carry out speed tests to determine page loading speeds. There are tools you can use, such as Google PageSpeeds. If you determine that there is a problem, you need a way to fix them. Our article will share with you six reasons why your website is slow and how to fix them.

The average eCommerce conversion rates fall around 1% to 2%, and it measures the checkout rates which don't include newsletter signup or abandoned carts with customer emails. If you have a brand new website, the conversion rate may fall far below 1% despite advertising on Facebook, Google Ads, and other comparison shopping engines. It is harder and harder to make money from online stores, and the average conversion rate continues to decline for new merchants.